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Despite Tech Prowess, Israel Ranks Low on Autonomous Vehicle Readiness

Despite Tech Prowess, Israel Ranks Low on Autonomous Vehicle Readiness

Israel is a hub of autonomous vehicle technologies, but when it comes to readiness for the future car it ranks below the median. A 2019 Autonomous Vehicle Readiness Index published by global accounting firm KPMG placed Israel in 14th place out of 25 countries surveyed.

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In 2017, Intel acquired automotive chipmaker Mobileye, turning the latter’s Jerusalem headquarters into its global center for driverless cars operations. Automakers including General Motors and Mercedes-Benz are developing autonomous technologies in the country, and Volkswagen has recently partnered with Mobileye on a robotaxi service intended to launch in Israel later in 2019. Mobileye’s autonomous test car, Jerusalem.

Photo: Mobileye This is the second time KPMG publishes the index, which assesses readiness for autonomous vehicles by using four main parameters: policy and legislation, technology and innovation, infrastructure, and consumer acceptance. As countries progress towards the adoption of autonomous vehicles, the report’s authors state, the technology will have a significant impact on a variety of sectors and industries—policing, insurance, healthcare, power generation and power grids, entertainment and advertising.

The Netherlands and Singapore came in at first and second place, respectively, as they did in 2018. The Netherlands earned its place mainly to its government’s active legalization and policy making and its focus on autonomous public transportation. For Singapore, the report’s authors stressed the strength of the country’s innovation and research. Israel’s relatively low ranking was a result of low scores on policy and legalization (18) and infrastructure (21).

The country ranked first out of the 25 locations surveyed on technology and innovation. Much of Israel’s “outstanding performance” in this category is a result of the military background of many of its entrepreneurs, according to the report authors. Comparatively, the Netherlands came in 10th and Singapore ranked […]

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